Creating Mobile User Interfaces for SharePoint 2013 3

The following is a re-post of an article I wrote for the Amazon.com tech.book(store): Because of SharePoint’s prominent role for both corporate intranets and public facing internet sites, there is often a strong push to have SharePoint serve information in a mobile friendly layout. There are several ways to approach this topic in SharePoint 2013. First, because SharePoint 2013 supports modern browsers, you could look at the modern techniques of responsive web design (RWD). Another option, is to use some of the new features that Microsoft has provided with SharePoint Server 2013, specifically device channels. In this post, we will look at some of the pros and cons to these options. Responsive Web Design RWD is the idea that one design can be applied to a web site and this design will respond to the device that is loading the page and adjust the layout to match various features of the browser like height, width, resolution, and ...

SPTechWeb Article: Shaping up images in SharePoint 2013

My latest article about image renditions in SharePoint 2013 is up at SPTechWeb. I cover the basics of turning on blob caching, adding a new image rendition size, cropping an image rendition, and changing the size of an image when it’s been added to a page. Shaping up images in SharePoint 2013

SharePoint 2013 Basic Search Center Branding Problem 3

SharePoint 2013 Basic Search Center Branding Problem
So, I had thought we were in the clear from the old 2010 Search Center branding disaster. For the most part custom branding applies pretty easily to search sites in SharePoint 2013 thanks to the fact that it just uses the default Seattle.master for search branding. However there is a gotcha, specifically related to the Basic Search Center template. I think the problem is only this one template, but maybe there are other areas affected. I tested the Enterprise Search Center and the default search and neither had issues. Basically what happens is when you are creating your custom branding, chances are you will be applying a customized master page (one that is edited with a mapped drive or SharePoint Designer), and the Basic Search Center uses a snippet of code block to try to hide the ribbon when the Web Part management panel is up (I have no idea why this was so important ...

Starter Master Pages Update v1.3 7

Over the weekend I pushed out a small but important update to my starter master pages. When I originally created the starter master pages I used both the Design Manager feature as well as Seattle and Oslo to decide the best place to put things in the master page. There was a discrepancy between where the Design Manager and the default master pages placed the SPWebPartManager control. Turns out the Design Manager puts this control in the <head> section which is incorrect, it should be in the <body>. Having the control load before the <body> caused a host of mysterious problems so I have moved it to the body and I urge everyone to follow suit. UPDATE: All of my starter master pages can now be found here: https://github.com/rdrisgill

Moved from Blogger to WordPress 4

After trying WordPress for our user group website I decided that it is a far superior blogging platform than Google’s Blogger. I’ve been meaning to move off of Blogger for a while now but was afraid of the potential hit to my Google results due to a change in URL formatting. Since coming over to Rackspace, I realized that I have access to create WordPress sites with through our cloud hosting so I decided to give it a try. I was pleased to find that there are tools for importing all my old posts and comments from Blogger to WordPress as well as settings to reformat the WordPress URL’s to match Bloggers URL format. I was then hopeful that I could make the move fairly seamlessly so I flipped the lever on Saturday evening (weekends are pretty slow for SharePoint web traffic). The first thing I noticed was that clicking on my Google results from my phone was taking me to the correct ...

Sticky Footers in SharePoint 12

I get this question a lot these days: “How can I add a sticky footer to the bottom of SharePoint”. So much so that I decided I need to have a blog post that points to my solution to the problem. First, what it a sticky footer? I consider this to be a footer at the bottom of a page that stays “stuck” to the bottom of the browser window ONLY if the page content does not fill up the full page. If you want a footer that sticks to the bottom without considering the page content, you can easily float one above the content always stuck to the bottom with just absolute CSS positioning. How do I solve it. There are many ways this problem could be solved ranging from intelligent HTML and CSS creation to jQuery based solutions. I am leaning towards a jQuery based solution because often with SharePoint you don’t have ...